DPReview Review the Canon PowerShot A620

With their usual excellent style and depth, Digital Photography Review have looked at the new Canon PowerShot A620, and it looks very nice indeed. It’s the replacement for the A95, which was a popular camera, and it looks like this should be even more so.

  • 7.1 megapixels (probably the same sensor that’s in my Ixus 750, which certainly performs well).
  • 4x optical zoom (nice to see a little more than the usual 3x).
  • Fast performance – the DIGIC II processor makes things much faster than previous cameras, and they seem to be getting better at focusing too.
  • Usual Canon build and reliability – the main reason I bought a Canon.

It’s by no means pocketable like my Ixus is, but gives you a bit more control and a bit more zoom, both of which can come in useful. If you don’t mind having a compact that’s not very compact, this could be a great camera.

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Camera you can Focus Afterwards

A Stanford graduate student has made a prototype camera that allows you to focus the image after taking the shot. The images are fairly low resolution, but then again, it’s only the first prototype.

Interesting idea. Not sure how practical it will be, but it all depends how the technology can be applied in real life. Certainly a different approach, though.

Object Duplication Art Show

An art group called Gelitin has made a huge sealed wooden box, with extensions for you to insert and retrieve objects. Somehow, inside the box, the objects are copied…

Eventually – the wait can be from a few minutes to more than an hour – a light on the other extension goes on. Open the door, and you’ll find your object joined by a brand-new, handmade “duplicate,” or at least something that more or less resembles the original.