Painting Step-by-Step

Latest Update: Rolled in Danny Gregory’s step-by-step, and another one from Chuck Rose. These were both in separate posts before, but they fit better in here with their friends…


Danny Gregory

Danny Gregory gives us a step-by-step insight into the making of one of his drawings – from sketching with pen to colouring with watercolours. Fascinating stuff, and all nicely done in the form of a comic.

Coop

Coop’s work is NSFW – it contins huge orange breasts. And Atari joysticks.

Nude with Atari Joystick

In this, he paints on two panels, each six feet square, a fairly well-spread and well-endowed woman, with an oversize Atari joystick just about obscuring her most private parts. He made quite a few notes during the process, so there’s quite a bit of information to it. He does say he enjoys the process much more than it looks like he does in the photos…

  • Part 1 – including a shot of the plans in his Moleskine notebook.
  • Part 2 – the colour starts to appear, and by the end, you start to get a good feel for the end result.
  • Part 3 – the basic colour is all done, but a lack of cadmium orange paint stops play.
  • Part 4 – the black is filled in, solidifying everything, and highlights and shadows start to make everything feel more 3D.
  • Part 5 – looking pretty near finished, but still filling in detail.
  • Part 6 – The End. Including the Pain of the Joystick, and a dash to the finish before the landlord tears the roof off the studio for repairs.

A fan has created an animated .gif file of the process too, which is a great way to see the whole thing from start to finish…

Violet Blue has visited Coop at his studio, and took a few pics – including one of this painting – and another – keep clicking next. Then go back, and click back a time or two to see more of the studio.

Chuck Rose

Chuck has been kind enough to do several step-by-step paintings and share them on his blog…

Watercolour painting of peppers on a chopping board…

Gareth Spor

Gareth made a huge work of art on a multitude of panels, and made a spectacular quicktime video of the whole process, made over a period of around a month and a half. Unfortunately, there’s no notes other than the video file itself, but it’s worth the download to see something this big taking shape a chunk at a time.