Post-Op Ramblings – Part Two

Today my tiny pouch friend Thumbellyna and I celebrate a month together. We’ve had quite a ride. Most of the time I feel no different than I did before. Thumbellyna sits there quietly and doesn’t make a fuss unless I do something daft like eat too quickly, eat too much, or eat food that’s just far too lumpy for her to process. And when that happens, she just quietly whispers “do not want”, and I have half an hour cuddling a bucket.

In the last month, I have learned a few valuable lessons. The main one being to take it slowly. It took a few bucket-cuddling sessions for this to sink in. For the first week of so, I had the most dreadful ‘mouth hunger’ (meaning having a real fancying for something in spite of not actually being hungry), which brought on some pretty vicious moods and a large amount of moping.

Advice for anyone considering weight loss surgery – try to avoid having it just before Xmas. Living on slop while everyone else is munching mince pies, stuffing balls and little sausages wrapped in bacon is hell. I managed to have a dinner on Xmas Day, thanks to Michael – he took stuffing and sausage and blended it up with mash and gravy. As delicious as it was, it was still painful to see everyone else’s instagrams of platefuls of turkey, roast potatoes, etc.. I was even craving sprouts. So, yes, if you are going for surgery and you have a choice as to when you have it done, have it six weeks before Xmas or four weeks after. Save your sanity.

On the subject of slop (i.e. the “puree” stage of the recovery diet) – it took me a while to get around to doing this, but it really is worth getting some baby food in. After all, we’re learning to eat again, and the ready made meals for babies and toddlers are really quite decent. Ella’s Kitchen meals are particularly good, and just the right amount for Thumbellyna.

The important thing to remember with weight loss surgery is that we all react to food differently. What works for one person may not work for another, and the only way to be sure is to try it. There will be setbacks. There will be sudden rushes to the loo. There will be times when you ‘worship the porcelain god’. It’s part of the process.

Now I’m making the slow journey back to the wonderful world of solids, I have to pay careful attention to the rules. While I’m getting to used to this new routine, I have alarms set up to tell me to take my meds, timers set up to tell me when it’s OK to drink (drinking too close to meals can affect the quality of the nutrients getting in to your system), and I have a stopwatch going during meals so I can time the one-minute gap I have to take between each mouthful. It’s a faff right now, but it will get easier in time.

Here is a video of the Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass. WARNING – it’s not for the squeamish. This is from a hospital in America. There is a possibility I may be able to get hold of a video of my own operation. If I can, and if I’m allowed to share it, I will upload a copy so everybody can see my insides. Lovely.